Change how you think of change

Spiral

Struggling to get started on changing some aspect of your life?

Perhaps adopting DiClemente’s and Prochaska’s way of looking at change will help.  Rather than thinking of change as a single act their research suggests it is a process with a number of stages including lapses along the way (please refer to photo above).

A lapse is exactly that, a small slip down the spiral not a collapse.  Be gentle with yourself and avoid “all or nothing” thinking.  If your goal is to get fitter by walking 10,000 steps a day and you didn’t manage it today that’s OK, no need to set fire to your trainers and face plant a pizza.

Precontemplation (Not Ready)

We’re either unaware being unfit is problematic or acutely aware but unsure what to do or not confident we can do anything after past, unsuccessful, forays into Lycra.  We underestimate the benefits of changing and overestimate costs, both monetary and in terms of the effort involved.

Contemplation (Getting Ready)

We’re coming around to the idea that there might be some advantages to the change e.g. being able to enjoy physical activity with family and friends versus dreading it.  That said, we’re alternating between thinking this and believing the work involved is just too much, too uncomfortable.

Preparation (Ready)

We stop assuming change is too tough and start researching how to go about it e.g. join other people who are trying to get fitter so we feel less conspicuous.  We try out different classes to narrow down activities we like. We buy the fitness DVD of a celebrity or sports personality we admire so we can workout in the privacy of our own home when it suits us.

Action

We’re done preparing and ready to go for it.  We know what we are going to do, we have a goal and a plan. We have put in place the support systems that we need and actually, you know what, it is beginning to feel a bit exciting.  Crucially this is not a “quick fix” rather we know that slow and steady is the way to embed lasting change.

Maintenance

Once we’ve got fit we have evidence we can do it, have been through (and survived) lapses so we feel more confident in our ability to sustain our fitness and motivated to keep at it because of the benefits we’re feeling.

Termination

This really is Nirvana, the ultimate goal of change, a stage where we’d no more think of NOT doing our favourite form of exercise than stop breathing.  It is like we were never our former unfit selves.  If we don’t do the activities that we have chosen as a means of keeping fit then we feel like something is missing in our lives.

© 03/05/2017 Untangle Your Life 2017

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